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The Connaught ID GT
Connaught

British engineering firm and racing car manufacturer Connaught Cars (1959) Ltd of Send in Surrey offered a series of conversions on the ID in the early sixties.

These were aimed at improving both power and torque output and involved re-working the cylinder head, increasing the compression ratio, fitting twin carburettors, lightening the flywheel, fitting stiffer valve springs, etc.

No modifications were carried out to the bodywork although a DS dashboard replaced that of the ID and a "Stirling Moss" steering wheel was fitted together with "sports" bucket seats.

CitroŽn Connaught

The cars started life as an ordinary ID.

Early conversions were fitted with a Midlands High Power brake servo, later ones with the DS braking and steering systems.

A DS cylinder head but with a compression ratio of 8,5:1 instead of 7,5:1 was fitted, together with enlarged exhaust ports and stiffer valve springs.

Twin Solex or SU carburettors were fitted together with a lightened flywheel which allowed for considerable improvements in performance.

Power output was lifted to 90 bhp approximately.

It is rumoured that the company built a few supercharged versions.

CitroŽn Connaught

By 1962, sales had increased to such an extent that rather than work on customers' previously purchased cars, the company supplied its own converted vehicles (now called the Connaught GT) at a premium of GBP30 over that of a standard Slough-built DS19.

CitroŽn Connaught
CitroŽn Connaught acceleration
CitroŽn Connaught
CitroŽn Connaught
CitroŽn Connaught
CitroŽn Connaught

Performance figures in Imperial

CitroŽn Connaught top speed

1963 model

Standard ID19

Standard DS19

Connaught GT

Maximum speed MPH [kph]

86.5 [139.2]

95.2 [153.2]

101.0 [162.5]

0-60 mph [96.5 kph]

19.9

18.4

15.5

Standing quarter mile [402 metres]

22.1

21.9

20.5

Fuel consumption MPG [litres/100 km]

26.6 [10.62]

24.3 [11.62]

23.6 [11.97]

© 1998 Julian Marsh